Welcome


Eoghan Evesson
Eoghan Evesson
Team Leader
English

Welcome to the English section of the Junior Cycle for Teachers (JCT) website.

This section contains information and resources to support you, as teachers of English, in planning for, teaching and assessing Junior Cycle English. In order to assist you in the process of planning using Learning Outcomes, we have created short videos in the Planning Section of this site. You may find it useful to watch these as a subject department to support you in planning collaboratively.
In our resources section, you will find material related to the different aspects of Junior Cycle English. To support you in choosing suitable texts from the prescribed lists for example, we have created a guide to the twenty prescribed novels and have gathered examples of book and film trailers that your students might enjoy. We have also included resources which might help you to engage your students in writing as a process as well as developing supporting material for oral language strategies in the English classroom.
In addition to our online supports, the JCT English team is delighted to be working with teachers in core CPD workshops which address teaching, learning and assessment of Junior Cycle English from planning to pedagogy. We also look forward to supporting subject departments with 2 hour workshops which will be delivered in schools. If you would like regular updates on the supports and resources available, please join our mailing list using the link below.

If you require any further information, please contact your relevant Regional Leader or provide detail on the
JCT Support Enquiry Form

You may also like to follow our activity on Twitter

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Latest News

June 2016

We have produced a resources PDF which contains an outline, and links, to some key supports for teachers of English. The resource PDF also contains links to important documents and supports from the NCCA website curriculumonline.ie and the State Examinations Commission website examinations.ie.

Junior Cycle English Online Supports pdf

Junior Cycle English Online Supports
Click on image to view




If you are looking for more information on the Classroom Based Assessment, you may find the new supports available in the screencast section of our site to be useful. View screencasts here…




SLAR Facilitator CPD Day timetable April 2016
SLAR Facilitator Meetings

Click on image to view timetable




CPD for April 2016

CPD Day 2 is being offered in education centres nationally immediately after Easter. To secure a place in one of these workshops please contact info@jct.ie or Monaghan Education Centre on 047 74008

SLAR Facilitators CPD A full day’s CPD is being offered to all SLAR Facilitators. This CPD is taking place in education centres nationally. If you are the SLAR Facilitator in your school and have not registered with us, you can do so by contacting Monaghan Education Centre on 047 74008




Live Q&A

Transcript of our recent live Q&A that took place on our website on January 20th, 19:30-21:00. The focus of the online Q&A was on the Oral Communication Classroom-Based Assessment. Many thanks to all the teachers who asked questions and interacted during the event. View Transcript here…




February 2016:

In-school support visits in Planning and SLAR have commenced. ETB schools can register their teachers by logging on to www.jctregistration.ie




What you can expect from the English CPD Day

What you can expect from the English CPD day




October 2015

English Flyer




September 2015

JC English Infographic





English Mail Letter


  Join Our Mailing List

June 2016 - Mail No. 9
June 2016 English Mail No. 9



April 2016 - Mail No. 8
Oral Communication CBA



March 2016 - Mail No. 7
Newsletter 2016 No.7

Keep up to date and read the English mail letter. Receive future copies of ‘The English mail letter’ by joining our mailing list




Upcoming English Events



Frequently Asked Questions

  • Transcript of our recent live Q&A that took place on our website on January 20th, 19:30-21:00. The focus of the online Q&A was on the Oral Communication Classroom-Based Assessment. Many thanks to all the teachers who asked questions and interacted during the event. View Transcript here…

  • Q1. How can I share the learning outcomes with the class?

    Learning Outcomes are curriculum statements written for teachers. It would, therefore, be advisable to change them (or have your students change them) into student friendly language. Sharing a student friendly version of the learning outcomes- learning intentions- will help to give students a sense of purpose as they work through a lesson and will help them build understanding.
    Example: writing learning outcome 3
    Write for a variety of purposes, for example to analyse, evaluate, imagine, explore, engage, amuse, narrate, inform, explain,
    argue, persuade, criticise, comment on what they have heard, viewed and read.
    In this case you might be placing a focus on one aspect of a learning outcome. The student-friendly learning outcome might
    become ‘we’re going to learn how to critique a character from a text’, where you intend to focus on broadening your students’
    understanding of the ‘criticise’ aspect of this outcome.

  • Q2. How do I embrace principles, statements of learning and key skills while I’m teaching an English class?

    A. The key skills are embedded in the learning outcomes. This means that if you plan and teach with the learning outcomes, you have already begun to develop the key skills. For example, the key skills of ‘communicating’ and ‘working with others’ are embedded in the following learning outcomes: ‘know and use the conventions of oral language interaction, in a variety of contexts, including class groups…’
    ‘deliver a short oral text, alone or in collaboration with others’.
    Key skills really come to life in the methodologies you use, which is why you do need to keep the authentic integration of key skills in mind when planning. For example, while ‘working with others’ is a key skill, the strategies we use to get students working together; the extent to which students have clear guidance on what they’re expected to do; how long they have to do it; acceptable behaviour etc… will all contribute to how well they develop the skill of working with others.
    There are 8 principles, 24 statements of learning and 8 key skills (including literacy and numeracy) in the Framework for Junior Cycle. The English Specification has 39 learning outcomes across the three strands of reading, writing and oral language.
    As you plan and teach, guided by the learning outcomes, your students are beginning to engage with the seven statements of learning which are most relevant to English.

  • Q3. My class always studied one novel in first year, what should I do now to be in line with the specification?

    Continue with what you are doing but remember that wide reading is the key. The new specification gives us guidelines for first year which include “a studied novel with on-going sustained reading of novels throughout the year”. To be in line with the specification, you choose a class novel for study and you also promote and encourage reading for pleasure.
    You may have a library or reading class integrated into your timetable. If not, you may have a book club; book in a bag; DEAR; individual classroom libraries; or an arrangement with your local library for loan of class sets of books, etc…
    Students come in to us in first year accustomed to sustained reading of novels in the final years of primary school. To build on this practice, the new specification encourages reading for pleasure and gives us an “indicative list of novels”:, from which you can select, or you can choose titles which you know your class will enjoy.

  • Q4. How do we use the three weeks for preparation for the Oral Communication Assessment?

    Remember that developing oral language skills starts in first year and is supported by activities to promote classroom talk. Providing students with rich learning experiences and opportunities to explore language and ideas will assist your students in preparing for the oral communication assessment towards the end of second year.
    The oral communication assessment does not need to be a three week, ‘stand-alone’ unit of work. It can be part of a larger thematic unit of work where an oral communication assessment is just one of the assessment moments. During the three weeks of preparation time, students will research a topic which interests them, they may undertake some investigative work e.g. interview, survey, emailing, letter writing and so on. They will evaluate their research and decide how best to present it.
    Students can choose from a range of approaches, e.g. interview, performance, or response to stimulus material. Once students have decided on the approach they will take for their oral communication assessment they can, with the guidance of their teacher, co-create success criteria for such an approach. Some class-time should be set aside for students to practice or rehearse their task, ideally using their success criteria and the features of quality to peer and self-assess. You may find that triads are useful for these peer assessment moments; if each of the three students has a clearly defined role then their peer feedback should be more meaningful. For example, if Student A is practising his / her task then Student B may be asked to give feedback on one or two criteria/aspects and Student C will give feedback on another area entirely. In this scenario the teacher can move from group to group offering feedback to the students. The roles would then rotate and each student would get valuable practice as well as feedback from their peers which they can respond to before their oral communication assessment.

  • Q5. What changes should I make in my teaching of writing in first year so that I am in line with the new specification?

    From first year on it is a good idea to encourage your students to reflect on their writing after they complete a piece. Build in as much variety as is manageable so that they experience a range of texts and registers.
    You might ask them to read their work aloud and to consider what they did well and what might make it sound better. This will help them to become more aware of their strengths and of what they need to do to improve.
    On a practical level, they might occasionally write a short reflection note immediately after writing (‘what I learned from creating this text’ and ‘what I would do differently next time’) in order to get used to thinking about the writing process.
    A variety of tools can be used to encourage students to reflect on and make judgments about their reading and writing, e.g., student logs, goal-setting frameworks and journals. For further support in using these strategies, click here

  • Q6. How many times must I offer feedback on a student’s work before they submit it for assessment as part of their Collection of Texts?

    Feedback may come in many forms. Feedback is not only given so that the student can re-draft or edit a particular text. Feedback may lead to sharper writing in texts as yet unwritten. We are giving feedback when we respond to students’ questions; when we share examples of student work, examine what went well, discuss common errors and suggest ways to improve; when we read work over students’ shoulders and offer suggestions or questions to prompt deeper thinking; when we ask students to repeat and refine, suggest other things they might want to consider and all of the other things you do to encourage your students to write well and to enjoy the process.
    The process of drafting is important and students should be encouraged to be reflective as they draft. You don’t want to lose the fun and energy of the writing process by involving students in seemingly endless revision that actually adds up to very little improvement or learning. Redrafting must take cognizance of context and be undertaken in a measured way. It should never be pursued for its own sake and should be limited or extended as it fulfils its intended function, i.e. encouraging the student to develop a love of writing.
    Here is one possible scenario:
    A student co-creates the success criteria of a short story with her classmates and teacher. She then writes a short story and receives feedback from her peers. This peer feedback is scaffolded by the success criteria. She then acts on that feedback before giving the short story to you. You assess the work and offer feedback to the student, again focusing on the success criteria which you have agreed upon. The student retains her first draft, and begins to re-write and refine her work in response to your feedback. When she is happy with her work she adds it to her collection of texts alongside her earlier draft. You may wish to ask students to review their collection once a term to reflect on their development as writers. Before Christmas of third year, the student will examine her collection of texts and, with your guidance, will choose two pieces to submit for assessment. She may choose to refine these further before submission.

  • Q7. Must I cover all 22 Learning Outcomes marked for first year? Can I cover others from the 39?

    A. The 22 learning outcomes for first year were carefully selected as those that lead a student most naturally from the English programme in 6th class into first year. When you focus on these, you are helping your first year student in his/her transition from primary school.
    You are certainly free to work with your subject department in choosing additional learning outcomes from the 39 that suit your particular school and that suit the first year plan that you work on together.
    Many learning outcomes are very wide ranging. Take for example the first, oral language learning outcome 1,
    Know and use the conventions of oral language interaction, in a variety of contexts, including class groups, for a range of purposes, such as asking for information, stating an opinion, listening to others, informing, explaining, arguing, persuading, criticising, commentating, narrating, imagining, speculating.
    or,
    writing learning outcome 3,
    Write for a variety of purposes, for example to analyse, evaluate, imagine, explore, engage, amuse, narrate, inform, explain, argue, persuade, criticise, comment on what they have heard, viewed and read.
    Think of yourself and your students in any class, engaging with aspects of a learning outcome to which you will return over time. On each occasion you advance more deeply into understanding, perhaps using different texts or language assignments.
    Throughout this extended period, you are guided by the learning outcome. Over time, your aim is to build your students’ confidence in the three strands, oral, reading and writing through different learning experiences which they can enjoy and which can help them to see their steady progression in English.
    In subject planning with your colleagues, you can share a range of classroom strategies that help your students to achieve a learning outcome by returning to it as their proficiency develops in each of the strands over the three years.

  • Q8. Do all teachers of English have to do the same texts with their classes in first year?

    A. This is a school-based decision. You should plan as a group and decide on the learning outcomes which you will address over a given time. Part of this discussion will involve suggesting materials which would support the learning outcomes. It is not ‘carved in stone’ that you do the exact same materials. Situations such as book rental schemes and resources may play a part here. For second and third year school organisation may also play a part e.g. students moving between bands in the middle of the year; teachers assigning common summative assessments at Christmas, Easter, summer. Again, this is a school-based decision.

  • Q9. Our old English plan for first year was simple with good texts. How do we bring our plan in line with the new Specification?

    You are absolutely right to recognise that your current plan has areas of richness which will find their place in your new English plan. In the past, many plans were built around texts. The approach now is to begin by focusing on what you want your students to achieve (the learning outcomes) and then decide which texts are best suited to support your students in their learning. The learning outcomes in the new specification have strong links with the current JC English syllabus and with the primary curriculum, so a lot of what you already do will continue to be relevant because the long-term goals for language development are unchanged.
    The first year indicative list of novels is, as the name suggests, simply an indication of some texts you may wish to use; you are free to use the novels that you have used successfully in past years. The guidelines for first year do not prescribe a particular collection of poems, so the poetry choices you made in the past may well find their place in your new plan.
    When you begin your planning process, your department may choose to plan thematic units. For example, first years may experience a unit built around a theme such as ‘New Beginning’s. You may choose a number of learning outcomes across the three strands to be addressed in that term and may agree to use a novel, a drama, a short story, a number of poems and non-literary texts to support the learning. A thematic approach of this nature will inevitably promote intertextual awareness among students. It will also support an integrated approach towards oral language, reading and writing. It is not necessary for all the teachers in a department to use the same texts; each teacher might use a different range of texts to support the learning outcomes on which the department have agreed to focus

  • Q10. We find it difficult to write the name of every poem, non-literary text and drama extract that we might do into our plan. What can we do?

    A. Your teaching and learning will be guided by the learning outcomes across the three strands, reading, writing and oral language. Planning should therefore commence with the subject department examining the LOs and deciding which ones they wish to explore over the term.
    Texts can then be selected, bearing in mind those spontaneous teachable moments that occur throughout the year. Consequently, subject departments might not be rigidly prescriptive in the texts they initially choose. Scope may be allowed to add to the repertoire.
    The department might begin by selecting one or two key texts that will address some of the chosen learning outcomes. If for example, the department is using a thematic approach, e.g. with the focus on war, it might state that, ‘a selection of suitable war poetry, stories, film, texts (novel/play) will be chosen to ensure that the LOs will be addressed’.
    It is important also that texts chosen for ‘reading for pleasure’ should be selected with the reader’s ability in mind and that we as teachers should be mindful that there are a wide range of texts available for young people of all reading levels. Consultation with the Resource Teacher or other supports might help in choosing texts that will afford enjoyment in reading.

  • Q11. I’m nervous about my ICT skills. How can I start providing digital material for my students?

    If you have a teacher computer and an overhead projector, students can be exposed to and learn from digital multi-modal texts within your classroom.

    The following websites may provide a rich source of digital material for the English classroom:

    www.thisisirishfilm.ie, www.fis.ie, www.ifi.ie, http://www.filmsshort.com/ (short films)
    www.rte.ie/doconone (radio documentaries)
    www.bestadsontv.com (advertisements)
    www.theguardian.com/theguardian/series/greatspeeches (speeches)
    www.ted.com (talks)
    www.poetryoutloud.org, www.poetryireland.ie (poetry)
    www.buttonpoetry.org (performance poetry)
    www.themoth.org (storytelling)

    There are endless multi-modal texts available online and where possible, digital texts should be integrated as a normal part of teaching and learning in English. Take, for example, a unit of work you’re teaching first years in the run up to Christmas. Students may have engaged with a poem like Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening; they may have written a letter ‘from Santa’ to a younger sibling or cousin (modelled after JRR Tolkien‘s letters to his children); and now you may decide to show a viral Christmas advertisement by one of the big retailers to get students to think more critically about the way ads attempt to manipulate our emotions and behaviour. Thus, traditional and multi-modal digital texts are integrated in the classroom in the same way that they are integrated in our daily lives.

    While this all sounds very straight forward, we sometimes encounter very practical roadblocks when attempting to use technology in our classrooms. With this in mind, here are some tips for finding and using digital material:

    1. If you or your students use Google, you can turn on ‘safe search’ to ensure that inappropriate material is filtered out. You’ll find ‘safe search’ to the right of the search bar.
    2. You can define your search to be more specific, by clicking on ‘pages from Ireland’ or ‘videos’. You can also filter results by reading age.
    3. If you don’t have access to YouTube due to the level of filtering your school has chosen, you can go to www.keepvid.com, copy in the url address of the video you want, press download and it will save to your computer. If you then email it to yourself, or copy it onto stick, you‘ll be able to access it in class.

    NOTE: Not all multi-modal texts are digital. ‘Multi-modal’ texts are just texts which use more than one medium to communicate, so any text which combines two or more elements (writing, visuals, audio, video) is multi-modal. Advertisements, picture books and newspaper articles accompanied by a photo are all examples of multi-modal texts. What makes a multi-modal text ‘digital’ is the fact that you interact with it on a screen rather than on a page. This makes the integration of audio, video, interactive visuals and hyperlinks into the text possible.

    Further support in integrating technology in the classroom is available
    from www.pdsttechnologyineducation.ie and www.cesi.ie (the Computers in Education Society of Ireland).

  • Q12. How do I encourage reluctant readers to engage in sustained private reading as a pleasurable activity?

    A. In today’s world of technology, we must be mindful that students can be engaged in ‘reading’ in a way that may not always correlate with our traditional view of reading. The very same is true for what we refer to as ‘texts.’ Students may well see the films they watch, the games they play or other multimodal texts as ‘their texts’. On a daily basis, students may be reading the iconography of computers and this is the world in which they live. It is therefore important that readers/reluctant readers are presented with choices and variety of texts.
    A ‘pleasurable activity’ suggests enjoyment for the reader of whatever ability. Many teachers encourage students to source texts that they enjoy and that give them opportunities to engage at their own level of interest.
    Don’t forget to read to and with them!! In the same way, good teachers of writing will write with their students too.
    One of the greatest catalysts to encourage reluctant students to read is when we set aside time for discussions of texts that their peers have read. Peer recommendation is a useful starting point. The idea of taking students out of the classroom and into another ‘comfortable’ environment can also be an incentive to read as they may associate reading in the classroom as ‘more school work’. Given the specification guidelines for introducing non-literary texts into the classroom, many teachers are now introducing publications such as The Farmers’ Journal, their regional newspapers, sports biographies etc…

  • Q13. Should students study a prescribed Shakespearean drama for higher level?

    Yes. Students intending to take the Final Assessment at Higher Level should study the full text of a prescribed Shakespearean drama during second and/or third year.

Planning

In 2016/17, fourteen hours professional time is available to teachers of English, of which a maximum of 6 hours may be delivered via school closure and the balance through paid substitution hours. Some of this time can be utilised for teacher-led CPD sessions for junior cycle English planning.


  • > First Year Planning
    Click to open/close

    The resources below have been designed to support teachers and English subject departments in planning their first year English programme. In this section you will also find supporting materials linking with the primary school curriculum.



    Screencast Guide to Planning for First Year





    Subject Department Planning Guidelines for First Year 2016

    Subject Department Planning Guidelines for First Year 2016
    Click on image to view


    Sub set of 22 Learning Outcomes for 1st year English 2016

    Sub set of 22 Learning Outcomes for 1st year English 2016
    Click on image to view


    Guidelines for First Year Texts 2016

    Guidelines for First Year Texts 2016

    Click on image to view


    Indicative List of First Year Novels 2016

    Indicative List of First Year Novels 2016

    Click on image to view





    First Year Sample English Department Subject Plan 2016

    First Year Sample English Department Subject Plan 2016
    Click on image to view
    Download word version here…


    English Subject Department Planner for 1st Year (2016 2017)

    English Subject Department Planner for 1st Year (2016 2017)
    Click on image to view
    Download word version here…


    Subject Department Plan Template for 1st Year 2016

    Subject Department Plan Template for 1st Year 2016
    Click on image to view
    Download word version here…


    Junior Cycle English Interactive Unit Plan Template

    Junior Cycle English Interactive Unit Plan Template
    Click on image to view
    Download word version here




    Linking with Primary School Curriculum

    Junior Cycle English places significant emphasis on the continuum of language development from primary school. The Specification for English explicitly refers to this in the rationale:

    “The study of language enables students to build on their learning in primary school and further develop their skills and enjoyment in using it effectively. Through language learning and use, students discover information, develop thinking, and express ideas and feelings. They learn about language, and how to use it well in all areas of their studies.”

    To read more about the links between the primary language curriculum and Junior Cycle English click here.

    As a way of easing the transition from primary to post-primary English we have produced a Student Profile template that can be used with a first year English class as they start secondary school. Watch the two videos below to hear a sixth class teacher outline the main areas of the sixth class English curriculum and also some of the strategies she uses for teaching writing and reading.



  • > Second/Third Year Planning
    Click to open/close

    The resources below have been designed to support teachers and English subject departments in planning their second/third year English programme.



    Screencast Guide to Planning as a Department for Second/Third Year English





    Subject Department Guidelines for 2nd & 3rd Year 2016

    Subject Department Guidelines for 2nd & 3rd Year 2016
    Click on image to view


    Junior Cycle English Learning Outcomes HANDOUT

    Junior Cycle English Learning Outcomes HANDOUT
    Click on image to view


    Guidelines to inform choice of texts for 2nd and 3rd year 2016

    Guidelines to inform choice of texts for 2nd and 3rd year 2016





    Click on image to view


    Circular for prescribed text

    Circular for prescribed text
    Click on image to view


    Prescribed novels booklet 2016

    Prescribed Novels Booklet 2016

    Click on image to view


    Guide to the Prescribed Drama Booklet 2016

    Guide to the Prescribed Drama Booklet 2016
    Click on image to view





    Prescribed Films Poster

    Prescribed Films Poster 2016
    Click on image to view

    Second Year Sample English Department Subject Plan 2016

    Second Year Sample English Department Subject Plan 2016






    Click on image to view


    Sample Mini Unit Class Plan 2016

    Sample Mini Unit Class Plan 2016
    Click on image to view


    Junior Cycle English Interactive Unit Plan Template

    Junior Cycle English Interactive Unit Plan Template
    Click on image to view
    Download word version here

    English Subject Department Planner for 1st Year (2016 2017)

    English Subject Department Planner for 2nd & 3rd Year (2016 2017)
    Click on image to view
    Download word version here…


    Subject Department Plan Template for 2nd Year 2016

    Subject Department Plan Template for 2nd Year 2016
    Click on image to view
    Download word version here…


    Subject Department Plan Template for 3rd Year 2016

    Subject Department Plan Template for 3rd Year 2016
    Click on image to view
    Download word version here…





Assessment

This section contains information and materials related to the ongoing & summative assessment of junior cycle English.







  • Assessment for JCPA

    Glossary of Terms

    Glossary of Terms
    Click on image to view


    Assessment for the JCPA

    Assessment for the JCPA
    Click on image to view





    Assessment in Junior Cycle

    This screencast takes an overarching look at assessment in Junior Cycle English. In this screencast we hope to deepen your understanding of assessment in Junior Cycle English


    Facilitator Guide Assessment Screencast

    Facilitator Guide Assessment Screencast
    Click on image to view


    Handout 1 Assessment Screencast

    Handout 1 Assessment Screencast
    Click on image to view





  • Ongoing Assessment
    Click to open/close

    The NCCA has produced a collection of ongoing assessment booklets ‘Focus on Learning’ to support schools and teachers in improved assessment practices.



    Juniorcycle.ie Assessment

    Assessment On-going-assessment





    Dylan Wiliam on: Formative Assessment



    Dylan Wiliam on: Feedback on Learning


  • Classroom-Based Assessments
    Click to open/close

    The Guidelines for the Classroom-Based Assessments & Assessment Task (First Edition December 2015) can be viewed here



    Oral Communication Classroom-Based Assessment

    This screencast focuses on looking at the key details surrounding the Oral Communication Classroom-Based Assessment. Throughout the screencast there are opportunities to pause and engage in different activities. If you are planning on engaging in the full screencast, inclusive of all activities, the workshop should take approximately 1 hour 30 minutes.







    Oral CBA Facilitators Guide

    Facilitator’s Guide
    Click on image to view PDF


    Learning Outcomes

    Handout 1: Learning Outcomes
    Click on image to view PDF


    Features of Quality

    Handout 2: Features of Quality
    Click on image to view PDF





    Conducting Online Research

    This screencast attempts to demonstrate how a teacher might conduct a ‘Think Aloud’ with their class regarding how to engage with online research.








    The Collection of the Student’s Texts Classroom-Based Assessment

    This screencast focuses on looking at the key details surrounding The Collection of the Student’s Texts Classroom-Based Assessment. Throughout the screencast there are opportunities to pause and engage in different activities. If you are planning on engaging in the full screencast, inclusive of all activities, the workshop should take approximately 1 hour 15 minutes.





    Collection Facilitators' Guide

    Collection Facilitators’ Guide

    Click on image to view


    Hand Out 1 Collection LEARNING OUTCOMES

    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Click on image to view


    HandOut 2 Collection

    The Collection of the Student’s Texts - Features of Quality
    Click on image to view







  • Digital Recording

    This screencast offers suggestions on how teachers might digitally record and share samples of pupils’ work surrounding the Oral Communication Classroom-Based Assessment, for Subject Learning and Assessment Review (SLAR) purposes.





    Subject Learning and Assessment Review(SLAR)Meeting & Oral Communication Classroom-Based assessment (CBA)

    The screencast is in two parts with opportunities to pause and engage in different activities throughout. If you are planning on engaging in the full screencast, inclusive of all activities, the workshop should take approximately 1.5 hours.







    SLAR & Oral CBA Participant Handout

    SLAR & Oral CBA Participant Handout
    Click on image to view


    Oral CBA Learning Outcomes

    Oral CBA Learning Outcomes
    Click on image to view


    Oral Communication Features of Quality

    Oral Communication Features of Quality
    Click on image to view





    Subject Learning and Assessment Review (SLAR) Meeting & The Collection of the student’s texts (CBA)

    Please note this area of the site will be populated with appropriate resources in due course.





    SLAR Facilitator Resources

    Facilitator CPD Booklet

    Facilitator CPD Booklet
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    Facilitator Templates Oral CBA

    Facilitator Templates for the Oral Communication CBA SLAR Meeting
    Click on image to view
    Click here to download word version


    Facilitator Templates Collection of the Student's Texts

    Facilitator Templates for the Collection of the Student’s Texts SLAR Meeting
    Click on image to view
    Click here to download word version


    Facilitator's Report

    Facilitator’s Report
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  • Final Assessment
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    The Final Assessment Details & Learning Outcome

    The Final Assessment Details & Learning Outcomes


    Higher level sample exam paper

    Sample Papers for Junior Cycle English Examination 2017



    Guidelines to inform choice of texts

    Guidelines to inform choice of texts


    Reasonable Accomodations



    Reasonable Accommodations